Vision can be in the schizophrenic brain via the mouse model

Dr Sawa, coauthor Dr. Toshitaka Nabeshima, Department of Clinical Pharmacology at Meijo University in Nagoya, Japan, and colleagues have shown that a temporary reduction of susceptibility genes linked to schizophrenia in the prefrontal cortex of mice just before or after birth led to aberrant changes in adult animals that are associated with schizophrenia, including disruption of specific brain dopamine pathways, failure of neural circuits, and serious behavioral problems.The authors are careful to warn that if their findings shed light on how early the disease is associated with the impact of events as a function of the adult brain, the manipulation of a gene can not fully define the complex neuropathology associated with schizophrenia. Although it is a piece of the puzzle, our study may help understand how the initial molecular insults during early development interrupts the maturation of the brain after the birth of many years, resulting in an aspect full of schizophrenia or other mental disorders after puberty , says Dr. Sawa.

A simple genetic test could now be able to predict which patients are likely to experience side effects, allowing doctors to prescribe the drug more safely and saving many patients the trauma of major adverse reactions..

The researchers include Minet Niwa, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, Meijo University, Nagoya, Japan, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan, Atsushi Kamiya, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; Rina Murai, Meijo University, Nagoya, Japan, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan, Ken-Ichiro Kubo, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Aaron J.

Gruber, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, Kenji Tomita, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Lingling Lu, Meijo University, Nagoya, Japan; Shut Narita, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; hanna Jaar-Peled, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, Saurav Seshadri, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, Hideki Hiyama, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, Beverly Huang, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, Kazuhisa Kohda, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, Yukihiro Noda, Meijo University, Nagoya, Japan, Patricio O’Donnell, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, Kazunori Nakajima, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, Akira Sawa of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, and Toshitaka Nabeshima, Meijo University, Nagoya, Japan, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan, the project Frontier academics for private universities, Institutes of Comparative Cognitive Science, Nagoya, Japan.